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Ancient buildings of the Yucatan are similar to the ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia Buildings

The Pre-Columbus ancient buildings of Mesoamerica match, similar ancient buildings in Babylonia, ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia buildings, as reconstructed from their ruins.

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 "Which Jared came forth with his brother and their families, with some others and their families, from the great tower, at the time the Lord confounded the language of the people..."  (Ether 1:33)
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  << El Paso Herald, newspaper April 25, 1912

“An interesting theory, now strongly held by scientists and scholars of the Smithsonian Institution, is that the Mayas are descended from the ancient people of Babylon who were dispersed over the face of the earth after the capture of that famous city by Cyrus.”

[Actually it was not the "Mayas" who were descendants from the "people of Babylon" but it was the Jaredites who were the descendants from the "people of Babylon".  
It was not until 1941 that two Mexican archaeologists, Alfonso Caso and Miguel Covarrubias, along with an American archaeologist, Matthew Stirling, proclaimed that a culture that has become known as the Olmecs was the mother culture of Mexico.  It was this earlier group of people, who were called the Jaredites, as recorded in the Book of Mormon, who came from the “tower of Babel”.
The Maya who were descendants from the Lamanites, did not come directly from the "tower of Babel".  They did however come from the same Egyptian/Mesopotamia, "Jerusalam" area as shown on the map below.]

“Science now believes that the Mysterious Mayas of the Yucatan came from Ancient Babylon after the Confusion of Tongues addition to this there is other evidence that the Mayas came from somewhere in Asia.”  “…Assyrians constructed scores of such terraced towers; the Mayas built thousands, many of them of huge size and of substantially the same pattern-likewise.
According to the Maya legend, Xelhue one of the seven giants who survived the Deluge, erected a pyramidal tower of enormous height for the purpose of storming Heaven.  But the Gods destroyed it with lightings and confounded the languages of the builders.
This evidently gives strong confirmation to the theory that the prehistoric inhabitants of Yucatan brought the tradition of the tower and the story of the Flood with them from Assyria.
Certainly nobody anywhere else in the world, save the ancient Assyrians and Babyonians, ever built temple-covered towers like those found today in ruins all over Yucatan.
In as much as these people certainly did not originate in America, they must have brought their notions of architecture from somewhere else.  There are many well-known reasons for believing they were Asiatic by origin.  Such being the case, this close similarity of their pyramids to those of ancient Babylon would seem obvious to indicate Assyria as the earlier home of their race.  Furthermore, they had, and their descendants today still possess, traditions of a Deluge
[flood] and a Tower of Babel- the story of the latter being substantially the same as that which has come down to us in the Bible.
The Tower of the Sun at Teotihuacán, Mexico, showing its Extraordinary resemblance to the Tower of Babel and other similar buildings in Babylonia, as reconstructed from their ruins."
 
 (El Paso Herald, April 25, 1912, p. 11)

  << Babylon Building, Ziggurat of the Ur Empire, reconstructed.

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 The archaeological site of San Jose Mogote dates to the Jaredite time period.
"San José Mogote, was founded between 1700 and 1400 B.C."  
(
Social Patterns in Pre-Classic Mesoamerica, David C. Grove and Rosemary A. Joyce, Editors)

The Archaeologist Ignacio Bernal proposed a comparison between some of the brickwork at San Jose Mogote with that of ancient Mesopotamia, which was the area of origin of the Jaredite/Olmec people.    (Exploring the Lands of the Book of Mormon, by Joseph L. Allen & Blake J. Allen, 2nd edition, p. 174)